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Hiroshima Day

On August 6, Sutton for Peace and Justice was joined by supporters and local residents at Carshalton Ponds to mark Hiroshima Day.

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The short commemoration ceremony was led by Doris Richards (right), with readings by Junko Osanai, Naomi Aruliah and Mike McLoughlin.

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Participants floated flower petals on the ponds before observing a minute’s silence.

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Hiroshima Day – Carshalton – 6 August

Hiroshima Day commemoration event in Carshalton

At dusk on 6th August 2017 supporters and friends of Sutton for Peace & Justice will remember the victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs at Carshalton Ponds, Carshalton Surrey.

Please join us as we remember with deep sorrow the 6th August, 1945, when the US dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and, three days later, on Nagasaki.

We honour the victims. And we reaffirm that we must do all we can to ensure that such barbarity is never repeated and nuclear weapons are not used again.

The commemoration will take place at 8.00pm on Sunday 6 August, with readings and floating petals on the pond.

Please gather at 7.45 at the War Memorial, Carshalton Ponds, Honeywood Walk, Carshalton, SM5 2QJ.

(Short walk from Carshalton Station and Carshalton High Street; free parking in High Street car park from 6.30.)

 

 

Sutton Solidarity Peace March

Saturday 1st July in Sutton saw a Solidarity Peace March demonstrating a united voice against all forms of extremism in Britain.

Religious, community and civic leaders gathered together at the bottom of the High Street and processed up to Trinity Square, where they were joined by more local residents and campaigners.

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At the square there were a number of short speeches from the Mayor Cllr. Jean Crossby, Carshalton & Wallington MP Tom Brake, the leader of the council Ruth Dombey, Charles Mansell on behalf of the local Labour party and representatives of the various religious faiths in Sutton. Sutton & Cheam’s MP Mark Scully was away and sent a message expressing support.

The short ceremony ended with the laying of flowers at the Square by all the marchers.

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The Imam of the Ahmadiyya Mosque speaking at the end of the march – the Ahmadi’s slogan “Love for All, Hatred for None” inspired them to initiate the march.

(Reporting by Mike McLoughlin)

Sutton Peace March 1 July

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Refugees Welcome Here – 23 June

Refugee week meeting, Friday 23 June 2017, 7.30pm

at Sutton Quaker Meeting House, Cedar Road, Sutton

Sutton for Sanctuary, Sutton for Peace & Justice and Refugee & Migrant Network Sutton invite you to a meeting to hear how refugees contribute to our community and how we can make them welcome here.

Hear the story of the Basque children who came to live in Sutton during the Spanish Civil War.

Listen to first-hand accounts of four people living and working in Sutton who came here as refugees and were helped to settle by Refugee and Migrant Network Sutton.

Learn about the Sutton project that is part of the Community Sponsorship Scheme, under which community groups support Syrian refugees coming to Britain to help meet the UK Government’s commitment to take 20,000 from camps in the Middle East.

And find out what you can do to help today’s refugees find a welcome and establish a new home here.

 

No entry charge, donations will be taken.

Please reserve a place by email to admin@sutton4sanctuary.uk or text to 07740 594496.

 

Refugees welcome here – meeting in Sutton 23 June

Refugee week meeting, Friday 23 June 2017, 7.30pm

at Sutton Quaker Meeting House, Cedar Road, Sutton

Sutton for Sanctuary, Sutton for Peace & Justice and Refugee & Migrant Network Sutton invite you to a meeting to hear how refugees contribute to our community and how we can make them welcome here.

Hear the stories of how people who came to Sutton as refugees have contributed to our community.

And find out about what is being done to help today’s refugees establish a new home in Sutton.

No entry charge, donations will be taken.

Further details will be issued shortly.

Please reserve a place by email to admin@sutton4sanctuary.uk or text to 07740 594496.

In defence of development aid

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Tom Brake and Graham Gordon speak in support of development aid

Reporting by Mike McLoughlin.

At a well-attended meeting hosted by Sutton for Peace and Justice at Friends Meeting House in Sutton on 28th April, Graham Gordon and Tom Brake spoke on why International aid is good for both the recipients and for us.

Both have extensive experience in the subject, Graham Gordon as Head of Public Policy at CAFOD, a leading aid agency, and Tom Brake as present and past Lib-Dem spokesperson on international development.

Tom Brake said that over the last 18 months or so there had been a concerted effort by some of the press to talk down the benefits and exaggerate the failings of aid. One success of this campaign had been the appointment of Priti Patel, an opponent of aid in general to head up The Department for International Development (Dfid) which she once said should be abolished. She has said we will promote transparency but by shifting DFID money into Prosperity, Security and Empowerment funds its use will become less transparent. The “Prosperity” fund will provide cash for private businesses, the “Security” fund probably be used by the Ministry of Defence, the most non-transparent and unaccountable ministry and the “Empowerment “ fund is for the Baltic States who are not high on anyone’s list of the world’s poorest countries. With all these moves the provision of aid will become more political and less able to fulfil its purpose to eradicate poverty in the world.

Tom Brake concluded by saying we should lobby our political parties and their election candidates telling them how much we value aid and encourage its focus on eradicating poverty.

Graham Gordon agreed with Tom Brake in that the quality of our aid was in danger from the skewing of the debate possibly leading to the reduction of our involvement to only disease eradication and responding to natural disasters. DFID was recognised as a world leader in humanitarian aid but also in development aid in areas such as the alleviation of the impact of climate change, improvement of the position of women and girls, and strengthening of civic society for long term development. He quoted several typical schemes in countries as far apart as Zambia and Myanmar whose success was apparently unknown to the aid deniers. These included provision of water boreholes which then enabled girls to attend school because they no longer needed to spend their days fetching water from great distances, providing training in cyclone preparedness so that communities were able to quickly recover from the next cyclone caused by climate change and schemes to strengthen civic society and governance enabling more transparency and so enabling governments to improve their tax take and therefore provide service to their communities.

Graham also mentioned the Commonwealth Development Company, now know as simply CDC, a part privatised arm of DFID. There was little evidence of it being successful at generating jobs by providing capital and loans to private companies. However Ms Patel planned to give it much greater funds. In fact private enterprise is not very good at working with civic society or focussing on the poor, the two most important areas if we really want to eradicate poverty.

Both speakers concluded that we should be proud of our contribution to reducing poverty across the world and being one of the first in the rich world to commit to 0.7% of GDP. Many millions of people have benefited from our generosity and many millions more rely on our continuation of this generosity.