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The Colloquium in Carshalton Park

Sutton for Peace and Justice brings you

The Colloquium in Carshalton Park

Throughout the day of the Environmental Fair on Bank Holiday Monday 28 August at Carshalton Park, Sutton for Peace and Justice will be hosting a series of informal and open discussions on a range of peace and justice issues:

11.30 Sutton 4 Sanctuary – Refugees welcome here
Helping refugees find a welcome and establish a new home in Sutton, including the Community Sponsorship Scheme.

12.15 Inequality is not inevitable
Inequality is bad for everyone and austerity is making it worse – but there is an alternative.

13.00 Climate Change – threat to peace & justice
Action on climate change is essential – now more than ever.

13.45 The plight of Palestinians today
How the rights of ‘the non-jewish communities of Palestine’ are ‘prejudiced’ 100 years after Balfour.

14.30 In defence of the Human Rights Act
The Human Rights Act protects us all and needs our support.

15.15 Stop nuclear proliferation – scrap Trident
Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki –Trident should be scrapped.

16.00 Sutton 4 Sanctuary – Refugees welcome here
Helping refugees find a welcome and establish a new home in Sutton, including the Community Sponsorship Scheme.

All at the Sutton for Peace and Justice stall J04–J05.

Come along and hear about these important issues, have your say and join the debate.

Colloquium – an informal gathering for the exchange of views, from latin ‘to talk together’; a seminar usually led by a different academic or expert speaker at each meeting.

 

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Hiroshima Day commemoration in Carshalton

On 6th August 2017 the anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945 was marked at Carshalton Ponds.

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Supporters and friends of Sutton for Peace & Justice along with local residents and ward councillor Chris Williams gathered at the ponds at dusk.

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Doris Richards (right) led a short ceremony, with readings by Junko Osanai, Naomi Aruliah and Mike McLoughlin, which expressed deep sorrow for the events of the 6th August, 1945, when the US dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and, three days later, on Nagasaki, and honoured the victims.

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Hiroshima17 reading2.jpgThose present urged everyone to do all they can to ensure that such barbarity is never repeated and nuclear weapons are not used again, and called on the UK government to scrap the Trident missile system.

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Participants then floated flower petals on the ponds before observing a minute’s silence.

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Hiroshima Day

On August 6, Sutton for Peace and Justice was joined by supporters and local residents at Carshalton Ponds to mark Hiroshima Day.

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The short commemoration ceremony was led by Doris Richards (right), with readings by Junko Osanai, Naomi Aruliah and Mike McLoughlin.

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Participants floated flower petals on the ponds before observing a minute’s silence.

Hiroshima Day – Carshalton – 6 August

Hiroshima Day commemoration event in Carshalton

At dusk on 6th August 2017 supporters and friends of Sutton for Peace & Justice will remember the victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs at Carshalton Ponds, Carshalton Surrey.

Please join us as we remember with deep sorrow the 6th August, 1945, when the US dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and, three days later, on Nagasaki.

We honour the victims. And we reaffirm that we must do all we can to ensure that such barbarity is never repeated and nuclear weapons are not used again.

The commemoration will take place at 8.00pm on Sunday 6 August, with readings and floating petals on the pond.

Please gather at 7.45 at the War Memorial, Carshalton Ponds, Honeywood Walk, Carshalton, SM5 2QJ.

(Short walk from Carshalton Station and Carshalton High Street; free parking in High Street car park from 6.30.)

 

 

Sutton Solidarity Peace March

Saturday 1st July in Sutton saw a Solidarity Peace March demonstrating a united voice against all forms of extremism in Britain.

Religious, community and civic leaders gathered together at the bottom of the High Street and processed up to Trinity Square, where they were joined by more local residents and campaigners.

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At the square there were a number of short speeches from the Mayor Cllr. Jean Crossby, Carshalton & Wallington MP Tom Brake, the leader of the council Ruth Dombey, Charles Mansell on behalf of the local Labour party and representatives of the various religious faiths in Sutton. Sutton & Cheam’s MP Mark Scully was away and sent a message expressing support.

The short ceremony ended with the laying of flowers at the Square by all the marchers.

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The Imam of the Ahmadiyya Mosque speaking at the end of the march – the Ahmadi’s slogan “Love for All, Hatred for None” inspired them to initiate the march.

(Reporting by Mike McLoughlin)

Sutton Peace March 1 July

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Remembrance not celebration

Today, the 11 November, we seem to need a reminder of why we mark 11 am on the 11th day of the 11th month, and how the focus has shifted from Armistice Day to ‘Remembrance Sunday’.

The original spirit of marking Armistice Day was to remember those who had given their lives and to pledge to prevent such loss of life happening again – in remembrance, not ‘celebration’.

How many times have we heard veterans of both world wars saying that they do not want to be described as heroes, and rather that we should remember those who died when they survived.

The way this annual call for peace has been hijacked and transformed into a glorification of militarism is a disservice to those who deserve to respected and remembered.

It is well worth reading this report by Joe Glenton, written after Remembrance Day last year, that expresses this better than  I can.

Joe Glenton was a British soldier for six years, serving in Afghanistan, whose book Soldier Box was published in 2013. Follow him on Twitter at: @joejglenton

Posted by Mike Cooper.