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Palestinian village Susiya under threat

Ecumenical Accompaniers monitoring the situation in Susiya have reported that Israeli officials visited the village on 16 June to advance the plans for its illegal demolition. This included taking photos of all of the buildings – a sign, based on previous experiences, of plans to carry out the orders imminently.
Many EAs and their supporters have already written to  MPs,  but if you haven’t had the chance so far, please do click on the link below to write and ask them to act urgently (or to update those you have already contacted), particularly in light of these new developments:
 
Write to your MP

Please share this action throughout your networks.

This action has also been tweeted and Facebooked  – please share these widely on social media too.

(Information from Doris Richards with thanks to Stephanie Hunt, Advocacy Research Officer, Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine & Israel (EAPPI); e: stephanieh@quaker.org.uk

www.quaker.org.uk/eappi

Screening of ‘The Stones Cry Out’

Christianity was born in Palestine two thousand years ago. From there it spread throughout the Middle East and to the rest of the World.

For more than 60 years, Palestinians – Christians and Muslims – have suffered displacement, expulsion, wars, occupation and oppression.

Yet the voices of Palestinian Christians have too often been drowned out in the turmoil of events.

This is their story, in their voices.

A film by Jasmine Perni, 2013.

Being screened by Sutton for Peace and Justice, Friday 25 July 2014, at Freinds House, Cedar Road, Sutton, SM

Doors open 7pm for 7.30pm start.  No entry charge, donations will be taken to cover costs and support the filmmakers.

Please reserve you seat by email to <sutton4peace@yahoo.co.uk>

A rare chance to see this film not previously screened in this area.

The Stones Cry Out – voices of Palestinian Christians

For more than 60 years the Palestinians have suffered displacement, expulsion, wars, occupation and oppression. Many of those who have suffered are Palestinian Christians but their voice is often drowned out in the turmoil of events.

‘The Stones Cry Out’ is their story, from the Nabka of 1948 to the present day.

Palestine, where Christianity was born two thousand years ago, is home to some of the oldest Christian communities in the world.

In 1948, when tens of thousands of Palestinians were driven from their homes in the Galilee to make way for the settlers of the newly created state of Israel, Elias Chacour, now the Archbishop of the Galilee, was just a boy.  His village of Kifr Bir’am  and its church today lie abandoned and crumbling.

In 1967 the West Bank was appropriated; then came the settlements, and the wall that hems in Bethlehem – the birthplace of Christ.

Palestinian Christians suffer from discrimination restrictions on movement, the  checkpoints, land appropriation and house demolitions, the expansion of jewish settlements,  that make It difficult for Palestinians to worship freely and Holy sites are vandalised. Their numbers are dwindling as many emigrate as a result of the difficulties of living under Israeli military occupation .

Too often the media show the conflict in Palestine as a fight between Muslims and Jews, ignoring the role of  Palestinian Christians in their land’s history and the struggle to maintain its identity.

The film recounts the unwavering and sometimes desperate struggle of all Palestinians to resist Israel’s occupation and stay on their land.

Sutton for Peace and Justice is screening The Stones Cry Out on Friday 25th July 2014, at Friends House, Cedar Road, Sutton, SM2 5DA. Doors open 7.00pm, film starts at 7.30.

There will be no fixed entry charge, but donations will be taken to cover our costs and help support the film makers.

To reserve your seat – email to sutton4peace@yahoo.co.uk or  text to 07740 594496.

A rare chance to see this film in south London.

Please print and display the attached poster where others who may be interested in the film will see it.

For further information about The Stones Cry Out and Christians in Palestine, go to www.thestonescryoutmovie.com

Every day life in the Occupied Territories

A fascinating and thought-provoking exhibition of photographs taken by Palestinian children of life in their home village in the Occupied Territories is touring schools in the London Borough of Sutton.

The photographic exhibition ‘Everyday Lives in the Occupied Territories’, showcases photographs taken by Palestinian children as part of a project undertaken by international volunteers on the Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel – an initiative of the World Council of Churches, managed by Quaker Peace and Social Witness. The exhibition has been collated by local resident, Ecumenical Accompanier and Sutton for Peace and Justice member, Doris Richards.

On Monday 27 Feb, Greenshaw High School hosted the opening of the exhibition attended by the Mayor of Sutton, seen here with Doris Richards.

The exhibition will be hosted by a number of primary and secondary schools across the Borough during March, April and May.

If your school, community group, place of worship or meeting place would like to host the exhibition, please contact Doris : email to dorisric@blueyonder.co.uk

The exhibition is a joint initiative of Sutton for Peace and Justice and the Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel.

Everyday life in the Occupied Territories

An exhibition of photographs taken by the children of Yanoun.

Yanoun is a village in the heartland of the occupied Palestinian territories, 20 km east of Nablus. International volunteers, known as Ecumenical Accompaniers (EAs), spend time in the village to offer support and protection to the 80 men, women and children who live there, with virtually no facilities, surrounded by illegal Israeli settlements.

Last summer, EAs gave each child in the village a disposable camera to take pictures of their everyday lives. The resulting pictures have been made into a moving exhibition, which was opened at Portcullis House (offices and meeting rooms attached to the Houses of Parliament) on Thursday 3 February 2011.

The opening event, compered by EA Doris Richards of Sutton, was addressed by Tom Brake MP, Albert Givol of New Profile (Israeli anti-militarist group) and Linda Ramsden of the Israeli Campaign Against House Demolitions.

The Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI) is an international initiative of the World Council of Churches, managed by Quaker Peace and Social Witness. EAs offer support and protection to Palestinian and Israeli residents and activists through nonviolent presence and monitor the situation in Israel and the occupied territories.